1. Dr. Lisa Milenkovic
  2. STEM+CS Supervisor
  3. Investigating Conceptual Foundations for a Transdisciplinary Model Integrating Computer Science into the Elementary STEM Curriculum
  4. http://elementarystem.mspnet.org/index.cfm/home
  5. Broward County Public Schools, Outlier Research
  1. Annmargareth Marousky
  2. Computer Science Coordinator
  3. Investigating Conceptual Foundations for a Transdisciplinary Model Integrating Computer Science into the Elementary STEM Curriculum
  4. http://elementarystem.mspnet.org/index.cfm/home
  5. Broward County Public Schools
  1. Debra Thomas
  2. Computer Science Instructional Specialist
  3. Investigating Conceptual Foundations for a Transdisciplinary Model Integrating Computer Science into the Elementary STEM Curriculum
  4. http://elementarystem.mspnet.org/index.cfm/home
  5. Broward County Public Schools
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Jennie Lyons

    Jennie Lyons

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 02:48 p.m.

    Absolutely wonderful integration of the different subjects into student learning through a variety of projects. The video shows examples of digital literacy (use of computers for research) and computational thinking. Are there key computer science concepts that the students are learning as well?

     
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    Annmargareth Marousky
  • Icon for: Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Presenter
    May 15, 2017 | 03:58 p.m.

    Hi Jennie,

    Thank you for your feedback. We have deliberate, key CS concepts integrated at each grade level. The 3rd grade progress through the concepts in course 2 of Code Studio, CS Fundamentals; 4th grade and 5th grade progress through course 3 and a bit of course 4. CS concepts are introduced on a "need to know" basis as to keep with the integrated approach. For example, the concept of an EVENT is essential when developing an interactive artifact - part of the culminating CS project for all three grade levels.

     
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  • Icon for: Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Presenter
    May 15, 2017 | 04:03 p.m.

    This “Time for CS” project tackles the constraints of instructional time in the elementary day through interdisciplinary instruction that integrates computer science with science and social studies providing the context. The impact has been reflected in the positive responses and engagement of students, but a bit more difficult to engage teachers. Our initial reaction from teachers is they think the idea is good, but they are skeptical of their ability to change their teaching to the interdisciplinary approach - especially when adding CS, a subject totally new to them. What do you perceive as challenges to this approach from the teacher, student, administration and curriculum point of view?

     
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  • Icon for: Sally Crissman

    Sally Crissman

    Senior Science Educator
    May 15, 2017 | 05:10 p.m.

    instructional time constraints can surely get in the way of teachers trying new (and better, we hope) ways of doing things-integration is a promising way to introduce computer science concepts. While students progress through the three grades, how do you make sure a 4th grade teacher, for example, knows the Grade 3 content she can expect students to have under their belts, and the 5th grade content that will follow? Sally

     
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    Annmargareth Marousky
  • Icon for: Ben Sayler

    Ben Sayler

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 06:10 p.m.

    This is an interesting question. Do schools participate in your project as an entire school? Or do teachers sign up to participate as individual teachers. A coherent system of 3rd grade CS, followed by 4th grade CS, followed by 5th grade CS is surely optimal, but that would require whole-school buy-in.

     
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    Annmargareth Marousky
  • Icon for: Annmargareth Marousky

    Annmargareth Marousky

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 08:27 p.m.

    We were definitely working with a whole-school buy-in formula. It has become a school culture.

     

    We selected 8 schools to participate as our "treatment" schools and all of the 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade classes at each school participated in the project. Our schools are very diverse in their student demographics and exists in very different areas of our district (we're the 6th largest in the nation).

     

    We trained the teams as grade level units during professional development that focused on each of the specific modules - two modules per grade level - and all teachers were given access to all module materials for all grade levels. One member of each grade level for each school was selected to act as designee and communicate with the other grade levels at their school so they were aware of the curriculum and help plan integration. having all teachers on a grade level participate allowed them to plan together and share ideas for integration of CS. It allowed them to feel more confident that if they struggled with any of the new CS concepts, there was someone they could turn to for support and clarification.

     

    The administration at each school was very supportive of the curriculum and CS integration. They assigned a school designee to facilitate communication between the school and our team. The literacy coaches attended the same professional development and were formed into a supportive cohort that could share information between schools and support ELA integration through science and social studies. Finally, we invited "specials" teachers (art, media, science, etc.) to attend professional development and contribute to the integration of the curriculum beyond the main classroom. All members of these teams were given access to curriculum, as well, to facilitate a common language and support.

     
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  • Icon for: Ben Sayler

    Ben Sayler

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2017 | 05:37 p.m.

    This level of systemic buy-in sounds great. You write as if the initiative is over. Has the project come to an end? Are the schools still implementing?

     
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  • Icon for: Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 02:09 p.m.

    Schools are still implementing the 2nd module - we end here June 8, so a few more weeks of implementation. Then on to data analysis!

     
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  • Icon for: Ben Sayler

    Ben Sayler

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2017 | 11:25 p.m.

    Good luck!

     
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  • Icon for: Jennie Lyons

    Jennie Lyons

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 10:01 p.m.

    In developing a program for 4th grade teachers we found that many of the things that teachers already do in class have science/computer science concepts embedded, e.g. the idea of place value in math taught as decimal, but binary can be integrated here as well. Are you looking for/finding similar content relationships in other subjects? 

    I really like the idea of EVENT being included in 4th grade. A great way to build on a concept that will eventually lead to something much more complicated.

     
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    Annmargareth Marousky
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    Adi

    Graduate Student
    May 18, 2017 | 07:58 a.m.

    Very Intresting!

     
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  • Icon for: Annmargareth Marousky

    Annmargareth Marousky

    Co-Presenter
    May 19, 2017 | 12:29 p.m.

    Thank you! It has been wonderful working with the 117 3rd - 5th grade teachers and their students (about 2,300 in total) from such soci-economically diverse backgrounds. We are impressed by the student engagement and the support of the teachers and administrators for CS integration.

     
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  • Icon for: Kip Glazer

    Kip Glazer

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2017 | 07:53 p.m.

    I love that you discussed the whole-school buy-in. I think it's important for young students to consider learning how to code as something all students can do. Great job! I was intrigued by your industry partnership. I am curious as to whether you had any suggestion in regards to building such a partnership with a non-academic entity. How do you ensure student data privacy? Or a perception that an outside entity is influencing school decisions? 

     
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  • Icon for: Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Dr. Lisa Milenkovic

    Presenter
    May 21, 2017 | 01:56 p.m.

    Hi Kip,

    We are the district in the Research-Practice Partnership with Outlier as the research partner. All data is anonymized before we share for data analysis. Same is true with our partnership with Code.org. We, at the district, are the project leads and the "keepers of the data" and everything is run through our IRB (in addition to the IRB at UChicago) with deliberate attention to student privacy. 

     
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  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.