1. Kyungwon Koh
  2. http://kyungwonkoh.com
  3. Assistant Professor
  4. Youth STEAM Learning by Making in Libraries and Museums
  5. http://infocreation.kyungwonkoh.com
  6. University of Oklahoma
  1. Traci Young
  2. Graduate Research Assistant
  3. Youth STEAM Learning by Making in Libraries and Museums
  4. http://infocreation.kyungwonkoh.com
  5. University of Oklahoma
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 14, 2017 | 05:28 p.m.
    Thank you for taking the time to watch our video! Please feel free to ask any questions you might have and share your comments.    If you’re a researcher or an educator who has been applying a Maker approach to STEM learning, do any aspects of this project resemble your experiences? What kinds of challenges and facilitators do young Makers experience as they engage in Making? How do you facilitate and support young people’s Making? What has been successful and not successful? What are the impacts that Maker education has on your community?    We look forward to seeing your comments and feedback! 
     
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  • Icon for: Pam Pelletier

    Pam Pelletier

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 04:31 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing this video--I am really curious about the Learning by Making Process Map. I am wondering about what was noticed as students shared their thinking and what new questions are coming from their maps and ideas. I work in a school district that is embracing "making" in a variety of ways and am left thinking about how this could be used to explore student learning and instructional practices.

     
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    April Lindala
  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 12:17 a.m.

    Hi Pam, thanks for facilitating the discussion! The process maps really help us understand the actual processes of making—including actions, feelings, helps & challenges, etc. students experience over time. Once we complete data analysis (the project concludes in May 2018), we aim to generate specific implications for instructional practices. We can leverage the behaviors teens identified as helpful, at the same time providing supports for the actions they reported as challenging. For example, many teens reported finding information is both helpful and challenging actions, which has implications on how mentors (such as librarians in library Makerspaces) can/should promote information literacy skills for young makers. 

     
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  • Icon for: Sue Doubler

    Sue Doubler

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2017 | 03:23 p.m.

    Kyungwon,

    Your description of maker spaces is helping me to understand this new area of learning. Thanks. In your dual focus of museums and libraries are you seeing similar skills emerging for both context, or are the skills context specific? Do you have any insights or hunches yet about the skills and knowledge needed, and the balance between structure and allowing students to figure things out for themselves? 

     
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    April Lindala
  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 01:16 p.m.

    Sue, I’m so glad to hear our video was helpful! It’s a bit early to say because we’re currently analyzing data, but teens across the contexts all said they’re learning 21st century skills, such as ability to direct their own learning, inquiry skills, and social skills. The ways professionals arrange and promote Maker learning were definitely diverse (e.g., formal - informal, long- and short-term, independent - collaborative projects, etc.), which was interesting. 

     
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  • Icon for: Kathryn Penzkover

    Kathryn Penzkover

    Higher Ed Administrator
    May 15, 2017 | 07:34 p.m.

    This is a great project and has the potential to impact a large swath of students. I'm curious how you are evaluating students learning through making. What behaviors are you looking for while students are in the maker space which show to you that they are engaged and learning? Can these activities be mapped to an increase in STEM identity among your participants? 

     
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  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 12:35 a.m.

    Thanks, Kathryn! In this project we investigate students’ learning by making mainly through their self-reports, because one of the goals is to understand the phenomena from the perspective of young Makers themselves. Although we didn’t attempt to “measure” their learning in this particular project, we gave students lots of reflection opportunities, such as journaling, interviews, and the process mapping activities. I think these self-report data can be used for evaluation as needed, if you create some rubrics for student responses. This project began with a broad, overarching question of how they are learning by making, and now I’m particularly interested in finding behaviors that show students’ sense of agency.

     
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  • Icon for: Lynn Goldsmith

    Lynn Goldsmith

    Researcher
    May 15, 2017 | 08:19 p.m.

    I'm also curious about your "process map." Can you tell us a little more about your methodology? Do youth complete these maps in individual, interview settings with a researcher, or in some other context?  How do you introduce the task and what role, if any, do researchers play in supporting youth during their process of creating the maps? 

     

     
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  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 12:45 a.m.

    Hi Lynn, the process mapping activity is conducted in individual interview settings with a researcher. A researcher asks some probing questions, and teens are encouraged to think aloud as they create a map. We always begin with appreciating their time and expertise and ensure that there’s no right or wrong way because this is “your” map and "you" are the expert. Most teens we met, if not all, were excited and enthusiastic to share their experiences with us in this way. Our website has some info about process mapping methodology (http://infocreation.kyungwonkoh.com/research/pr...) and I can’t wait to share more through full papers and reports soon! 

     
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  • Icon for: Deborah Hanuscin

    Deborah Hanuscin

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 12:46 p.m.

    The focus on dev21st Century Skills seems to be a big draw for districts-,are your process maps eliciting evidence of that?

     
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  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 12:55 p.m.

    Hi Deborah. Yes, both students and mentors reported students obtained 21st century skills as they engaged in making. Some of the skills included: ability to adapt and be flexible; ability to use technologies; ability to direct, monitor, and mange their own learning; ability to find information; ability create new knowledge; and ability to pursue personal interests and growth. 

     
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  • Icon for: Sue Doubler

    Sue Doubler

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2017 | 05:47 p.m.

    Kyungwon,

    I can see that the list of 21st Century skills will continue to evolve as society continues to innovate. I'm wondering if there are core goals of Maker Spaces other than skills?

     
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  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 10:06 p.m.

    Sue, I'm sure every Maker space has its own purpose, but to me sense of agency, equity, and community building are among the core goals/values. It's fascinating kids feel so empowered when they have ownership over their learning (e.g., creating artifacts based on their own interests and their own culture, students and teachers/professionals working as co-designers/partners). Students often create a project for other people, such as something that might solve a community problem. Since Making is so broad and involves a range of domains, it brings people from different organizations/fields and creates a community.  

     
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    Calypso Gilstrap

    K-12 Teacher
    May 22, 2017 | 11:57 a.m.

    Thank you for drawing the bridge not only between education and making but also libraries, schools, and museums!  I can't wait to see your results. 

     
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  • Icon for: Kyungwon Koh

    Kyungwon Koh

    Presenter
    May 22, 2017 | 03:59 p.m.

    Thanks, Calypso! Yes, it’s so important different organizations serving youth work together. Thank you for all you do for teens everyday! 

     
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  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.