1. Leah Clapman
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/leahclapman
  3. Managing Editor, Education
  4. PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs
  5. http://studentreportinglabs.org
  6. PBS NewsHour
  1. John Fraser
  2. http://www.newknowledge.org/our-team/
  3. President & CEO
  4. PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs
  5. http://studentreportinglabs.org
  6. New Knowledge Organization Ltd.
  1. Su-Jen Roberts
  2. Researcher
  3. PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs
  4. http://studentreportinglabs.org
  5. New Knowledge Organization Ltd.
  1. Bill Swift
  2. STEM Coordinating Producer
  3. PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs
  4. http://studentreportinglabs.org
  5. PBS NewsHour, Student Reporting Labs
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Leah Clapman

    Leah Clapman

    Presenter
    May 15, 2017 | 07:27 a.m.

    Thank you for your interest in the PBS NewsHour STEM Student Reporting Labs. Now in our second year, we welcome your thoughts on STEM literacy, journalism pathways into STEM, the intersection of media and STEM and new story ideas.

     

    Are you an educator or organization interested in starting a program or collaborating? We are also always looking for researchers willing to join our database of potential STEM mentors.

    Please leave all questions or comments here, or contact me at lclapman@newshour.org

    Looking forward to hearing from you!

     
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  • Icon for: Sarah Garlick

    Sarah Garlick

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 12:45 p.m.

    This sounds like a great project. I got a little emotional in the video at the description of "seeing the spark" in the focus group. :) I'm curious to hear more about the research. Can you tell us more about the study design and what kinds of things you are learning?

     
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  • Icon for: Leah Clapman

    Leah Clapman

    Presenter
    May 15, 2017 | 07:51 p.m.

    Hi Sarah! It is so wonderful to see students out in National Parks (this year's prompt) and having fun/being inspired by a school project. I'll ask the researchers to tell you more about the study design...

    Thanks!

     
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  • Icon for: John Fraser

    John Fraser

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 07:58 a.m.

    Hi Sarah,

    Our design uses a mixed-methods assessment strategy that explores contextual factors that contribute to student development of their science identity (Heidi Carlone commented below and she's done a lot on that topic).  In our first two years, we've been doing a comparative study of student learning, sense of their own place in the science enterprise with a comparison group of kids doing something similar not focused on STEM. We're developing a model that looks at the contribution of the experience, role of mentors, teachers, student peers, media types, and even topic.  We're interested in self-efficacy, student and community STEM and media literacy, and student interest in pursuing STEM careers once they are done. With the number of students involved in this project, we anticipate having a very robust quantitative model that can describe contextual factors that surround interest in STEM interest and career choice.

     
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    Sarah Garlick
    Leah Clapman
  • Icon for: Heidi Carlone

    Heidi Carlone

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 09:40 p.m.

    What a timely project! I appreciate how you position youth as community "experts" and showcase their work in public forums. I would be very interested in learning more.

    Can you tell me more about the structure of the program? How long do the students engage? How, if at all, are their teachers involved or is it an after-school program? What kinds of stories do the students “cover” and communicate? Where are their programs presented?

     
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  • Icon for: Leah Clapman

    Leah Clapman

    Presenter
    May 16, 2017 | 12:18 p.m.

    Hi Heidi! Teachers implement the program over the course of a year - usually in journalism, film-making or broadcast programs. This year the STEM Labs covered science in National Parks - the site will launch at the beginning of June, but you can see examples here: 

    Pygmy Mammoth skull found in Channel Islands

    Students help scientists hoping to save bats at Mammoth Cave National Park

    West Virginia searches for alternatives as coal mines close

    We are in teacher-led classrooms and after-school programs. Other topics:

    Outside the Box … young people challenging gender stereotypes

    The New Safe … how the concept of school safety has changed since Newtown

    Letters to the Next President

    New Americans

    Our very first series was Tough Calls … concussion awareness in youth sports programs

     

     
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  • Icon for: Heidi Carlone

    Heidi Carlone

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 07:55 p.m.

    Leah,

    Oooh, thanks for giving the sneak peek... LOVE the National Parks theme! Video is such a powerful medium... so empowering for the youth and compelling for the public. I will be following this work closely-- I'm so glad that I found out about it here.

     
    1
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    Leah Clapman
  • Icon for: Claire Quimby

    Claire Quimby

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 08:24 p.m.

    Can you tell us a little about teachers' reactions to the project? Finding ways to create crossover between STEM skills/knowledge and journalism seems like it could be very appealing for schools that are really trying to push STEM (which sometimes comes at the expense of electives like journalism). And what kinds of teachers are participating in the project?

     
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  • Icon for: Leah Clapman

    Leah Clapman

    Presenter
    May 17, 2017 | 10:57 a.m.

    Hi Claire - most of the participating teachers are broadcast, journalism and film - this project is about making interdisciplinary connections. Many of the teachers were nervous about STEM, but our curriculum is really about inquiry, helping students figure out what they don't know, investigating and talking to researchers. 

    Teacher reactions include:

    "They worked in teams all day and the park officials made them feel important and so very welcomed. I know that Friday had to be the most inspirational day in my entire teaching career. To see all of my students filming and watching a sunset for over 30 minutes was amazing. I am so, so proud of my students."

    Student reactions include: 

    • Working on the STEM story affected my thinking on STEM issues by really opening my eyes. My group did an ocean pollution story based off our waste and runoff affecting ocean life and even ourselves. I learned so much from research and I have become more conscious of my decisions and how they affect the environment. 
    • I view myself as a more capable storyteller. I actually researched a topic and dedicated many hours to actually make questions and get educated on my topic. By doing this I felt more confident in the story I was trying to tell.
    • It made me realize that STEM is more interesting than some people make it out to be if you care about the issue and want to learn.
    • I viewed Star Wars in a totally new and scientific way. ​
     
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  • Icon for: Claire Quimby

    Claire Quimby

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2017 | 06:55 a.m.

    Thanks, Leah! I've been asking this of other projects, and I'll ask it here too - do you have any good takeaways on what you've learned about working with classroom teachers and designing programs that work with the constraints they face?

     
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  • Icon for: Louise Allen

    Louise Allen

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2017 | 09:38 a.m.

    What a great project!

    What is the age range of the students involved? I cannot tell if they are high school or early college age.  I am  interested in STEM storytelling. I have done most of this work outside of the classroom in National Parks; you can check out our work with NPS park rangers (http://stemforall2017.videohall.com/presentatio... I have been trying to incorporate storytelling into my intro courses at the University, but it has mostly concentrated on written media (in the spirit of ScienceDaily web stories).  If you haven't tried it at the undergraduate level I would be eager to see what a difference it could make for college students early in their STEM degrees where we see a lot of drop off and students switching to different majors.  I would be interested in trying this as a semester long project or as a cross-listed communication/bio course at my university.  So much fun and they get to really own those stories.  Thank you for sharing!

     
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  • Icon for: Leah Clapman

    Leah Clapman

    Presenter
    May 17, 2017 | 10:43 a.m.

    Hi Louise - just checked out your project... wish we had connected last year!

    We are in 8 middle schools and over 100 high schools. I'd love to share our video story-telling curriculum so that we can see if your intro course instructors want to use it. Thanks!

     
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    Heidi Carlone
  • Icon for: Louise Allen

    Louise Allen

    Higher Ed Faculty
    May 17, 2017 | 12:33 p.m.

    Leah,  I will definitely check out the materials you linked.  Thank goodness for this showcase, its a great way to see so many great projects that we would miss. We have an AISL conference, but I imagine we would have missed your project if you are focused on classroom-based learning.  We should chat to see if there is potential for collaboration between iSWOOP and the Student Reporting Labs!  I'll send an email shortly.  We are actually mid way to Acadia for another round of PD sessions with the Interps there.

    Thank you for sharing!

     
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    Heidi Carlone
    Leah Clapman
  • Icon for: Bridget Dalton

    Bridget Dalton

    Researcher
    May 18, 2017 | 06:51 p.m.

    Inspiring work! I especially appreciate expanding multimedia options for learning and community.   I look forward to your research findings.

     
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    John Fraser
  • Icon for: Vivian Guilfoy

    Vivian Guilfoy

    Senior Advisor
    May 19, 2017 | 08:19 a.m.

    This is a great project!   Student "eyes" on their world are valuable  assets that can help other young people take a new look at the power of STEM in their lives.  The stories created by the students would be wonderful lead-ins for any STEM workforce development or career development program.  So often, students don't "get" the meaning behind STEM careers or if they are asked to "choose" what interests them, they don't have a real feeling for what STEM is accomplishing.  This makes an important contribution to that understanding and I hope it is used often in both schools and communities.

     
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  • Icon for: Bill Swift

    Bill Swift

    Co-Presenter
    May 22, 2017 | 11:12 a.m.

    Dear Vivian:

    One of the wonderful aspects of our program is that the students get exposure to real STEM scientists and mentors and have the opportunity to advance their projects through these interactions, but also these interactions gives them a chance to learn things not necessarily associated with their project.  How did you get interested in Glaciology, when did you know this was the career for you, what's your day like as an astronomer... Just great basic understanding of what it is to be a scientist, an engineer, or a mathematician.  

    One of my favorite quotes is from a scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab: "Engineering is about imagination".  What a great message for students.  I understand that as a scientist and an adult, but I'd never heard it expressed that way.  We are opening doors, but it is our students who are walking through them.

     
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  • Icon for: Sarah Dunton

    Sarah Dunton

    ECEP Alliance Manager
    May 19, 2017 | 03:38 p.m.

    The idea/concept of being 'fluent in science communication' seems like something that anyone engaging with STEM and CS should be integrating in their work with students of all ages. Radical acceptance of, and support for science could be driven by media integration led by students.

    What are the first steps to support fluency in science communication? Do you have a model/curriculum that can be shared? I am also wondering what the future plans for your project are? This project needs to be everywhere! Awesome project. The student leadership captured in the video is inspiring. 

     
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  • Icon for: John Fraser

    John Fraser

    Co-Presenter
    May 19, 2017 | 05:43 p.m.

    Sarah,

    I'll let Lisa respond to the resources question because PBS NewsHour has an amazing teacher support program beyond this research effort. The project is now ramping up after two years of experimentation with the student learning to look at how these students are supporting literacy advances in their school and community. We're now starting to look at the students as vectors for helping others develop STEM literacies. Effectively recognizing that learners can also help others learn with them.

     
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  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.