1. Kathryn Guimond
  2. Director, Department of Learning and Instruction
  3. LinCT: Linking Educators, Youth, and Learners in Computational Thinking
  4. Science Museum of Minnesota
  1. Lauren Causey
  2. Senior Evaluation & Research Associate
  3. LinCT: Linking Educators, Youth, and Learners in Computational Thinking
  4. Science Museum of Minnesota
  1. Aki Shibata-Pliner
  2. LinCT Program Manager
  3. LinCT: Linking Educators, Youth, and Learners in Computational Thinking
  4. Science Museum of Minnesota
  1. Kaleen Tison Povis
  2. Senior Evaluation & Research Associate
  3. LinCT: Linking Educators, Youth, and Learners in Computational Thinking
  4. Science Museum of Minnesota
Public Discussion
  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 14, 2017 | 07:44 p.m.
    The project team is excited about the multi-layered impacts of the LinCT program as it reaches students in science camps, high school youth as co-learners and co-teachers, teacher certification candidates, university faculty, and our own science museum staff. We are all learning and teaching together and seeing changes in comfort with, knowledge of, and value given to computational thinking and equity, as well as the ways formal and informal education can support and learn from one another. While we are still analyzing a lot of our year one data, this project has already lead to fruitful organizational level conversations and grant opportunities.   We'd like to learn from you and invite you to think with us on the following questions:
    • How can research help inform and bridge formal and informal education?
    • What are some of your creative dissemination routes?

     

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Michael Haney

    Michael Haney

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 10:00 a.m.

    Very nice presentation about community and very good examples of ways this makes inroads into classrooms.  The project uses multi-generational teams but I am confused about the intended impact beyond inservice and preservice teachers.   Their participation in the community is valuable to the community and undoubtedly to them, but what is the hoped for impact on others and how will these impacts be seen?  

     

    The presentation is about the community served and the dynamics of that community but I am quite unclear about the content.  Computational thinking was specifically mentioned, but are there certain computational methods and tools that the project emphasizes?

     
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  • Icon for: Kaleen Tison Povis

    Kaleen Tison Povis

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2017 | 03:53 p.m.

    Thank you for starting the discussion, Michael. 

    IMPACTS

    You're right the video focuses more on the LinCT community of young adults and teachers and we didn't present much on the boarder impacts yet. Ideally, we'll be back next year to share more :)

    In addition to the growth on the part of the participants in the program, we are looking for how participating (preservice) teachers go on to integrate making technology and computational thinking in their classrooms, thereby impacting all of their students. Excitingly, we have also started to hear of organizational level changes. For example, both of the universities from which we draw our preservice teachers are eager for these experiences and are building off of LinCT to provide more training for their teachers (grant proposals, new classes, and ideas are in process.)

     

    CONTENT

    Through programs such as App Inventor, Scratch, Stencyle, and 3D Printing, participants are exposed to new technologies, build their own understanding, and come to see how to incorporate technology into their classrooms in order to help their students become creators of rather than just users of technology.

    Along with content training around technology software, sessions address computational thinking, growth mindset, STEM equity, and social justice all of which become threads for reflection throughout the program experience.

     
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    Aki Shibata-Pliner
  • Icon for: Thomas Kalil

    Thomas Kalil

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2017 | 09:04 p.m.

    I thought the video was very strong  in conveying the value of an all-female professional learning community.  I'd be interested in knowing more about how the activities like App Inventor or Scratch are used to support computational thinking.  Also - what have been the challenges and benefits of making this a multi-generational activity?

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Aki Shibata-Pliner

    Aki Shibata-Pliner

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2017 | 07:51 p.m.

    Thank you Thomas, this is Aki who facilitates many of LinCT projects meetings with youth and preservice teachers. Scratch and App Inventor are helping us to understand concept (pattern, algorithm, decomposition, Logic...etc) of computational thinking through creating computational thinking approaches, such as creating actual hands-on project, debugging, collaborating, and etc. One thing I have been noticing that Scratch and App inventor projects we are creating, our LinCT female participants shows their perseverance to complete their projects and that is a part of CT approach to problem solving. I would refer to research and evaluation team to pull some quote from participants how they feel about multi-generational learning! Personally I observe multi-generational learning are creating amazing learning opportunity for high schooler as well as college students (age range of 20-40) They are learning from each other developing high schoolers leadership skills, preservice teachers are practicing listening skills as well as understanding different perspective of getting involving with students and how people learn. They learn and work side by side and making strong team together for 2 moths in training time, after that 2 months of learning together, they can use their team skills in summer camp teaching and classroom assisting together. Our activities are ice breaker, team builder, content training, tech training, equity practice, video making, website making, etc. 

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Michael Haney

    Michael Haney

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2017 | 07:37 a.m.

    Your own question about how to bridge formal and informal education is quite interesting and undoubtedly your multigenerational groups are part of the strategy.  I'm sure that in subsequent years the project will generate  more specific models and recommendations.  I know you are hoping other educators will provide suggestions to this discussion but later in the week (discourse) it would be interesting to hear some of the ways you think the project will try to bridge this gap.   

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 09:03 a.m.

    Bridging formal and informal education has been an exciting endeavor for us and we think there may be something here that other informal institutions could consider replicating. As we continue to collect our research and evaluation data I hope that we can come out of this project with a model to share more broadly. A couple of elements that I personally find important are:

    • Our museum educator team has an opportunity to learn from the pre-service teachers and what is new in the teaching field with regards to strategies and pedagogy (for example, it has been over 10 years since I completed my MEd and I would suspect there are new things I can learn about the field from our pre-service teachers and partners).
    • St. Kate's and Metro State are two of the most diverse schools in the Twin Cities - partnering with them helps us to met our goals of becoming a more diverse staff and bringing this important perspective to our team and to our audiences.

    Let me know your thoughts, and thank you for your post! Kathryn

     
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  • Icon for: Bernadette Sibuma

    Bernadette Sibuma

    Researcher
    May 17, 2017 | 03:39 p.m.

    I enjoyed the video and agree with the other posters that it really shows how creating a safe, non-judgmental place to learn new tech is a valuable component for successful preservice and inservice teacher training. 

    Can you say more about how you train your teachers to assess student learning of CT with these technologies?  Or do the teachers design their own assessments based on the project?

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 09:17 a.m.

    Great question Bernadette! Our evaluation team is taking the lead on assessing student learning of CT but we have been working as a larger team (including our museum educators and pre-service teachers) to make personal sense of CT and where we see that across all of our SMM learning experiences.

    A primary resource we are using for creating our assessments is from Scratch: http://scratched.gse.harvard.edu/ct/index.html

    Also, I have found these two articles to be really helpful for grounding us in understanding what CS, CT, and Coding are:

    https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-12-02-compute...

    https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-08-06-what-s-...

    What is really cool about engaging in this work with the larger museum team is that the whole team is excited about this work and digging into understanding these concepts and how they show up in our programs. In a group meeting two months ago we realized we do a lot with CT and now we have the language to go along with our learning experiences.

    Let me know your thoughts, and questions, Kathryn

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Bernadette Sibuma

    Bernadette Sibuma

    Researcher
    May 18, 2017 | 10:40 a.m.

    Thanks for the links, Kathryn!  And how exciting that the CT concepts already show up in your programs.  I would love to read any writeups you have that map your activities to the CT concepts.  Very cool!

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Sarah Carter

    Sarah Carter

    Manager, STEM Media & Education
    May 17, 2017 | 05:57 p.m.

    Great project! I love the inter-generational nature of the community you've brought together. I'm excited to see this group his impacted the teens and the educators. 

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 09:08 a.m.

    Thank you Sarah! So excited about co-presenting with you at ASTC this year!

     
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  • Icon for: Anna Suarez

    Anna Suarez

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2017 | 12:42 a.m.

    Very interesting project!

    The video touched on the use of Scratch and App Inventor in changing and supporting teachers' use of technology in the classroom.  Has integrating these programs into preservice education increased use in the classroom? 

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 09:25 a.m.

    Thank you Anna for your comment and question! As you saw in the video Vanessa has certainly brought her learning and experiences with these programs to her student teaching practices. This was really exciting for me to see and a bit of an unexpected result to see in her student teaching - this means she is also impacting the classroom teacher and school she is at for student teaching! The project did not have the timeline or capacity to follow our pre-service teachers into their future classroom so again, really cool to see this in a student teaching setting.

    That all said, we are working with our LinCT pre-service teachers to develop school year learning experiences that the museum will bring to the classroom setting. Using our residency model we have piloted 3 technology based residencies this school year, reaching over 1,000 classroom students. With the resounding positive feedback from the classroom teachers and their students this will be permanent programming going forward into the 2017-18 SY and beyond!

    Let me know your thoughts, and additional questions, Kathryn

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
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    Zan Christ

    May 18, 2017 | 02:45 p.m.

    Great job Science Museum of Minnesota! 

     
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    Shona Ramchandani
  • Icon for: Lauren Causey

    Lauren Causey

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2017 | 06:32 p.m.

    I appreciate everyone’s interest in our project!  I would like to add another illustration of how we expect the pre-service teachers to spread their new knowledge to formal education spaces:  The residencies which Kathryn mentions above is the project component which allows the LinCT pre-service teachers to loop back to the formal school environment.  This model is described more fully in a January 2017 article published in Connected Science Learning. Link: http://csl.nsta.org/2017/01/modeling-collaborat...

    Regarding multi-generational learning, our research findings so far are a little varied. For example, during our benchmarking interviews with the ten initial youth, six of the ten agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “I prefer to learn from people who are older than me.” We intend to monitor any changes in those opinions in follow-up interviews with the youth. (During participant observations, we try to monitor other things such as whether youth and pre-service teachers voluntarily sit among one another or whether they separate themselves by age.)    It has been a pleasure to work on the project so far and I do look forward to ongoing research and evaluation efforts! Lauren
     
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  • Icon for: Shona Ramchandani

    Shona Ramchandani

    High School Program Manager
    May 19, 2017 | 01:39 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing this amazing project and the beautiful journey that the youth and teachers have already completed in just one year! It is inspiring us in the KAYSC to figure out best practices in learning and teaching STEM, and in how to create a collaborative learning community around a strong content delivery model. Let's keep exploring how these collaborations can strengthen our research and our impact to broaden participation and promote equity/inclusion in computational thinking and STEM. Keep up the great work!

     
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  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 21, 2017 | 01:31 p.m.

    Thank you Shona for your comment! It has been such a great honor to partner with the KAYSC in this deep way through LinCT and as you know, I am just continually impressed with the young women on our LinCT team.

     
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  • Icon for: Christine Cunningham

    Christine Cunningham

    Founder & Director, Engineering is Elementary
    May 19, 2017 | 11:13 a.m.

    What a great project! I love the multigenerational approach to learning you have employed here. How do you reach out to communities that are traditionally underrepresented in STEM? Have you found that younger LinCT participants become student leaders in their own classrooms?

    -Christine

     
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  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 21, 2017 | 01:30 p.m.

    Thank you for your comment and questions Christine! There are several ways we are reaching communities that are traditionally underrepresented in STEM:

    1. Metro State and St. Kate's are the two most diverse universities in the Twin Cities - partnering with them has provided an opportunity to work with diverse teacher candidates.
    2. Partnering with the Kitty Anderson Youth Science Center at SMM has allowed us to reach female youth that might not traditionally access SMM and STEM learning.
    3. We are piloting our programming in Minneapolis and St. Paul Public schools - in particular, we are reaching schools that have a high percentage of free/reduced lunch students, as well as, a high percentage of students of color.

    Your second question is a really interesting question - I will have Aki and the eval/research team respond to that inquiry on Monday.

    Thank you again, hope you are well, Kathryn

     
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  • Icon for: Aki Shibata-Pliner

    Aki Shibata-Pliner

    Co-Presenter
    May 22, 2017 | 04:24 p.m.

    Hello Christine,

    Thank you for your positive comment and meaningful question. I am going to try to answer to your second question "Have you found that younger LinCT participants become student leaders in their own classrooms?" I have been facilitating LinCT youth for one year. As you might notice in our video, youth mention that they learn to be them and open up for voicing more in our community and beyond. I do not have too much encounter with their classrooms, but your question made me want to ask them that and reflect with them! They have been wanting to lead workshops using technology, and they are always excited about creating spaces for other girls to be enter to STEM filed, such as they lead table activity at museum floor, partnering with Scratch Jr teach at TUFTS university to run family workshops in community library, and some youth have asked me to help them to create after school activities at their own school. 

    Once again, thank you very much for asking that question, I am sure I will be paying more attention to what they are doing in their own classroom at their school this year!

     
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  • Icon for: Anna Suarez

    Anna Suarez

    Facilitator
    May 19, 2017 | 01:58 p.m.

    Kathryn, It may be worthwhile to submit either a supplement request or an ECR proposal to NSF to research some of your unexpected findings or to follow a subset of your preservice teachers to see if they continue to integrate IT once they have their own classrooms.  I know that with the CS for ALL program NSF has great interest to learn about how integrating IT into preservice impacts teacher knowledge and practice. 

     
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  • Icon for: Kathryn Guimond

    Kathryn Guimond

    Presenter
    May 21, 2017 | 01:24 p.m.

    Thank you for your suggestions Anna, we are certainly hoping to continue this work!

     
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    Gretchen Henke

    K-12 Teacher
    May 22, 2017 | 05:34 p.m.

    As a preservice teacher and a proud member of LinCT, I find it highly beneficial to learn from a multigenerational approach.  As one of the older participants in the program and being part of an early Generation X, the concept of technology and how I wanted to implement STEM felt overwhelming to me. This opportunity to collaborate and learn from my peers brought me practical insight in learning tech skills and how to approach teaching in the classroom.  There are many ways to solve a problem, but without a diversity of perspectives from a multigenerational workplace, those solutions may not be thought of, introduced, or considered.  The experience of each generation, shape who we are, what we value, how we value it, and how we prioritize those values.  I find that younger generations bring fresh insight and energy to a group, while the older generations offer wisdom and insight that comes from experiences and unique perspectives.  That depth of experience within LinCT and the workplace gave us more context to what's going on in the world.  Everyone's experience is different.  Each person adds to the conversation and gives you more exponential opportunities!     

     
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    Kathryn Guimond
  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.